Course

Football for Health

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6 Lessons

Physical inactivity is a very significant public health problem. As a society, we are becoming increasingly sedentary and more obese. This has obvious health implications. Physical activity is an important health intervention. Playing football for 45-60 minutes two or three times a week has been shown to markedly improve cardiovascular and musculoskeletal function. It is also associated with improved psychological well-being and mental health. These changes occur irrespective of the level of training, experience of the game, gender and age.

Health is key to development and growth. Developing countries have to fight poverty, hunger and infections. While HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis are still killing millions worldwide, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and heart disease are catching up. Football unites people of every age, gender, language, ethnicity, culture and religion. As a result, it may prove a uniquely effective and low-cost tool in the world’s fight for health.

Clinicians have an important role in influencing their patients’ behaviours regarding physical activity. This chapter discusses how football can be used to improve health outcomes, as well as how to prescribe physical activity, including football, as a treatment intervention.

“Playing football for 45 minutes twice a week – the best prevention of non-communicable diseases.”

Prof Peter Krustrup

Professor of Sport and Health Sciences

Presented by

Learning outcomes

By the end of this topic, you should:

  • be aware of the health benefits associated with playing football across the lifespan;
  • have insight into the potential of recreational football to aid the prevention and treatment of lifestyle diseases, including diabetes, osteopenia and cardiovascular disease;
  • have an understanding of how to organise recreational football training for untrained individuals across the lifespan, including people with no prior experience with football and patient groups;
  • know how to seek knowledge related to physical activity recommendations for untrained individuals and patient groups across the lifespan;
  • have an understanding of the “FIFA 11 for Health” programme and how it can be adapted to suit your country’s needs;
  • have an awareness of how football and other sports can be used to promote health outcomes;
  • be able to prescribe physical activity, including football, to your patients.

Tasks

  • Review the media content and read the provided text.
  • Read the “required” articles
  • Complete the case-based assessment task

References

  1. Bangsbo JA, Hansen PR, Dvorak J, Krustrup P. Recreational football for disease prevention and treatment in untrained men: A narrative review examining cardiovascular health, lipid profile, body composition, muscle strength and functional capacity. British journal of sports medicine JID – 0432520. 0104.
  2. Krustrup P, Nielsen JJ, Krustrup BR, et al. Recreational soccer is an effective health-promoting activity for untrained men. Br J Sports Med. 2009;43(11):825-831.
  3. Randers MB, Petersen J, Andersen LJ, et al. Short-term street soccer improves fitness and cardiovascular health status of homeless men. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2012;112(6):2097-2106.
  4. Helge EW, Aagaard P, Jakobsen MD, et al. Recreational football training decreases risk factors for bone fractures in untrained premenopausal women. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010;20 Suppl 1:31-39.
  5. Helge EW, Andersen TR, Schmidt JF, et al. Recreational football improves bone mineral density and bone turnover marker profile in elderly men. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014;24 Suppl 1:98-104.
  6. Krustrup P, Randers MB, Andersen LJ, Jackman SR, Bangsbo J, Hansen PR. Soccer improves fitness and attenuates cardiovascular risk factors in hypertensive men. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013;45(3):553-560.
  7. de Sousa MV, Fukui R, Krustrup P, et al. Positive effects of football on fitness, lipid profile, and insulin resistance in brazilian patients with type 2 diabetes. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014;24 Suppl 1:57-65.
  8. Schmidt JF, Andersen TR, Horton J, et al. Soccer training improves cardiac function in men with type 2 diabetes. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013;45(12):2223-2233.
  9. Andersen TR, Schmidt JF, Thomassen M, et al. A preliminary study: Effects of football training on glucose control, body composition, and performance in men with type 2 diabetes. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014;24 Suppl 1:43-56.
  10. Uth J, Hornstrup T, Schmidt JF, et al. Football training improves lean body mass in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014;24 Suppl 1:105-112.
  11. Bangsbo J, Junge A, Dvorak J, Krustrup P. Executive summary: Football for health – prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases across the lifespan through football. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014;24 Suppl 1:147-150.
  12. Orntoft C, Fuller CW, Larsen MN, Bangsbo J, Dvorak J, Krustrup PA. ‘FIFA 11 for health’ for europe. II: Effect on health markers and physical fitness in danish schoolchildren aged 10-12 years. LID – bjsports-2016-096124 pii] LID – 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096124 doi]. British journal of sports medicine JID – 0432520 OTO – NOTNLM. 0526.
  13. Orntoft C, Fuller CW, Larsen MN, et al. ‘FIFA 11 for health’ for europe. II: Effect on health markers and physical fitness in danish schoolchildren aged 10-12 years. LID – bjsports-2016-096124 pii] LID – 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096124 doi]; ‘FIFA 11 for health’ for europe. 1: Effect on health knowledge and well-being of 10- to 12-year-old danish school children. LID – bjsports-2016-096123 pii] LID – 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096123 doi]; planning and implementing a nationwide football-based health-education programme; ’11 for health’, a football-based health education programme for children: A two-cohort study in mauritius and zimbabwe; ‘football for health’–a football-based health-promotion programme for children in south africa: A parallel cohort study. British journal of sports medicine JID – 0432520. 0527.
  14. Thompson PD, Arena RF, Riebe D FAU – Pescatello, Linda,S., Pescatello LS. ACSM’s new preparticipation health screening recommendations from ACSM’s guidelines for exercise testing and prescription, ninth edition. Current sports medicine reports JID – 101134380. 0219(1537-890).
  15. Megnien JL, Simon A. Exercise tolerance test for predicting coronary heart disease in asymptomatic individuals: A review. Atherosclerosis. 2009;205(2):579-583.